Tall Girl movie review

Sarah Carrillo, Managing Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






This year, a new original Netflix movie, Tall Girl, directed by Nzingha Stewart covers teen issues, specifically about the normality in a high school environment where one girl feels that she differentiates from others due to her height.

The story takes place in New Orleans and features the main lead, Jodi who is sixteen and self-conscious about her height as she is 6 foot 1. Jodi feels that she is viewed and treated negatively due to her height. 

The film itself is incredibly straightforward. The title and trailer alone are enough for audiences to notice that there is a teen girl who is facing somewhat of a crisis as she believes she is not your ideal version of a high school girl, or what a high school girl is supposed to be. However, there is a deeper meaning behind the movie’s storyline and as you watch it, you can be able to relate it to your own life.

The Netflix film faced major backlash from viewers who believed the production was focused on bullying when actually, it mainly discusses a high-school teen’s insecurity and how she was able to overcome it. 

When I watched the film I saw that there was minor bullying from students throwing various phrases at Jodi that poked fun at her height. While one main character wasn’t necessarily a bully to Jodi, she was someone that Jodi always perceived as “the popular girl.” 

Most teens in high school feel they have to act or look a certain way to be accepted and this movie covered what most teens go through on a daily basis. The movie displayed the true meaning of friendship, accepting who you are as a person and self-love. 

A quote from the director herself, Nzingha Stewart stated; “We’re in a weird space. It’s hard to see a movie where someone has a hard time and not say it’s about bullying. But the movie’s not really a movie about being bullied for being tall. It’s about having insecurity and having to get over it and learn that the thing you’re ashamed of is the thing that makes you special.”

Overall, this movie was rated at 38 percent on Rotten Tomatoes and 86 percent of Google users enjoyed watching this film. I saw this film overall as a confidence builder through the use of character development. The film was also able to imitate the school atmosphere in which many teenagers find themselves relating to similar struggles. 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email