Behind the Scenes: The Asian Representation Club

Leaders of the Club present at their first club meeting.

Leaders of the Club present at their first club meeting.

Maya Lyou, Staff Writer

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The creation of the Asian Representation Club came to because of a student’s passion for advocacy of racial equality and to educate peers on Asian culture and stereotypes surrounding it.

The leader of the club, sophomore Kimberly Lee, explained that Asian representation at DVC isn’t as common as it is in other high schools. “I feel like if we did put an Asian club or like to represent the Asian population, we could be able to raise awareness on Asian issues around the world,” she said. 

Bringing awareness to the stigma and stereotypes around Asian families and the “rules of society” when it comes to Asian-Americans is extremely important to many club members. Assumptions are often about how Asians act, what Asians should look like, and general Asian culture. Creating a club where teens can become educated on what real Asian culture is could be beneficial to grow our school into a more supportive and informed community.

“Everybody, every race, faces some type of stereotype so I guess I know a lot about my race and stereotypes, I guess I just wanted to learn about this one,” freshman Sariah Francis, a club member, said.

The leaders have made the club available to anyone who desires to join, whether they are of Asian descent or not. The club has pushed that the reasoning behind the club is to discuss and include everyone rather than exclude anyone who may want to join.

The club’s hope is to have people coming from all cultures to join in on the conversation and to wish to learn more about a culture they may or may not be a part of. The plan is to discuss Asian issues but keep the club as a safe space for students to share their own troubles if necessary.

“I really realized [that] having cultural identity is super important, and helps people of that ethnicity to have a safe space,” said club advisor Tyler Mar. 

Cultural identity is very important to many students and teachers at DVC, and creating another cultural club gives students another option for a space safe to share their culture with.

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