DVC Talks Rx

Sarah Carrillo and Samin Champion, Staff Writer and Managing Editor

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January 30th, 2019 marked an important status quo for DVC, an age of schoolwide awareness and education in abuse, one that was paved towards by a lecture presented by Dr. Elizabeth Ozegbe, a CVS pharmacist.

Dr. Ozegbe’s lecturing career began in 2016 with CVS’s One Choice Lecture Initiative when the idea was pitched to local high schools in the context of students’ circumstances as growing adults and their communities and influences.

“We thought that the high school age group was the most influential, if we talked to them they would touch thousands of others and spread out that awareness,” stated Ozegbes. “The awareness also ensures that your generation doesn’t get ensnared in this epidemic.”

Ozegbe’s lecture was presented to two different groups of DVC students: one consisting of freshmen and juniors, the other of sophomores and seniors.

The lecture started with an interactive and engaging narrative and lesson, the issue of prescription drug abuse and how the choices students make today should be used to better impact the community, not hurt it.

Going forward with the narrative, one choice can change everything, Ozegbe played a video following a group of students living a happy content life in which the choice of taking prescription drugs broke them apart and even led to death.

Within minutes of the video, students had gone from a rowdy, disorganized social ground to an attentive and engaged group of listeners captivated by facts, statistics, and personal testimonies aimed at influencing students to make healthy drug-related choices.

Confronted with the narratives that your community is your responsibility, one choice can change everything, and their future is in their hands, students left the Black Box Theater empowered with the facts that they can choose to be whoever they want, and that there are individuals, professionals, and organizations there to help them the whole way.

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