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Humans of Metro

The stories and encounters of everyday Metro riders.

The stories and encounters of everyday Metro riders.

Vanessa Hernandez, Staff Writer

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“Expo line to Santa Monica now arriving.”

The empty colorful seats and the squeaking of wheels against the metal. The day is still young, men and women seated. A young man with frizzy curly hair bobbing his head to the beats playing in his earphones, and another man just a few seats away on his phone talking to his friend about upcoming plans.

Two pom pom pigtails, and a pink shirt, sat a girl with earphones in her ears. Lauren Wilson, a 14-year-old girl from Los Angeles, California was making her way to Downtown Santa Monica at 9:00 a.m. on a Sunday. At the age of 14 she seems to have herself figured out- as figured out as a fourteen year old can be.

“My mom doesn’t have a car, so when I want to go places I go to the metro to get places,” she said, waving her hands around in a circular motion.

The tires squeak against the rail and the ding of the intercom is what stops her response. As some people would have guessed, at 9:00 a.m. few teenagers are awake, so when a group of 17- year-olds walked onto the train it was quite surprising.

For the most part, everyone kept to themselves, despite the slight whispers flowing through the train.

“I like the Metro, it’s quiet. Sometimes I write on the bus, or listen to a complete album that I’ve  never listened closely too. It brings a sort of peace,” said Alex Morales, 19, a frequent Metro rider.

Alex, a freshman in college, rides the Metro every weekend. He said, “It’s simple. I don’t waste more money than I’m supposed to. I know my route, and I think being able to see different faces at every different stop is cool.”

It’s a known fact that on the Metro you will encounter different people. Some pleasant and others-well not so much. In fact, when asking some of the folks both on and off Metro, some had humorous stories to share.

“There was this one time, I was minding my own business and then a guy walks on the bus and he trips over his own two feet. Obviously it was funny, but then I guess he was upset so that clearly didn’t end in laughter,” said Morales.

Many like Morales has had the experience of witnessing people whom are aggravated, take it out on innocent people. He’s also seen people participate in acts of kindness, although he puts no mind to it.

The Metro is a way of transportation, with minor twists and turns to figure it out. When taking the Metro, young adults tell us that the Metro can be used for fun as well. When going out with friends, and sometimes even your family, the Metro could be in your options as a means to explore.

“I believe the Metro could be very beneficial to kids who can’t drive, or kids who on a budget. You can go to places like Hollywood, Santa Monica, Venice. The adventures are limitless,” said Andrea Perez, a senior in high school who rides the Metro to get to work on the weekends.

Some people may argue that the Metro is unsafe, unsanitary and has horrible service. For the most part it all varies on which buses you take, what stop you’re at, oron your definition of “clean.”

For students here at Da Vinci Communications, it’s all the same. A freshman from Da Vinci Communications High School, Valeria Munoz said, “It’s safe. If you mind your business, get on the right buses, get off on the right stop, it’s safe.”

From the beautiful art surrounding each city, to other compelling attractions, travelling with Metro can open opportunities to meet new people, learn their stories, or to figure yourself out, it’s simply an adventure. When young adults were asked if they would recommend the Metro, we were met with a series of “yes.”

After a tiring Sunday of being in the sun, the Metro is quiet. Everyone exhausted from their day, all wanting to go home. The nettling bings of the intercom interrupting the tiresome conversations and alarming some from their blissful naps. There in the corner of the train sat an old man in a plaid collared shirt and khakis, reading what looked to be To Kill A Mockingbird, he was calm and unusual.

“Kids are too wrapped up in doing the popular thing that sometimes they don’t realize doing the simple things are what make up the best memories. Darn yes, I say take the Metro.”

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About the Writer
Vanessa Hernandez, Photo and Video Editor

Vanessa Hernandez is a Senior at Da Vinci Communications as well as one of the Multimedia and Humans of DVC Editor. Vanessa enjoys spending her free time...

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