March For Our Lives

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March For Our Lives

The national walkout at Da Vinci schools that took place March 14, 2018

The national walkout at Da Vinci schools that took place March 14, 2018

The national walkout at Da Vinci schools that took place March 14, 2018

The national walkout at Da Vinci schools that took place March 14, 2018

Sophia Szekely, Staff Writer

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The sound of stomping feet echoed in the ears of our government officials who support the NRA (National Rifle Association). February 14, 2018 at 12:18 p.m., a tragedy forced itself into the lives of many American students.  Students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida experienced a school shooting, something that has become much more familiar than wished.

The reality of the shooting in Parkland, Florida is that seventeen people died: Alyssa Alhadeff, Scott Beigel, Martin Duque Anguiano, Nicholas Dworet, Aaron Feis, Jamie Guttenberg, Chris Hixon, Luke Hoyer, Cara Loughran, Gina Montalto, Joaquin Oliver, Alaina Petty, Meadow Pollack, Helena Ramsay, Alex Schachter, Carmen Schentrup and Peter Wang.

Currently, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School is in session, but the area of where the shooting took place is blocked off.

To show the power of protest and solidarity, a walkout was organized on March 14, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. High schools across the country walked out of school for seventeen minutes to commemorate the victims of the mass shooting in Parkland, Florida.

The teen protesters are marching for the rights of student safety, freedom of speech and much more.

When asked about his experience with walking out of school Matthew Ujemov, a junior at Da Vinci Communications said, “It felt like it was such a surreal moment. It was cool to see all three campuses come out and support.”

The March For Our Lives movement is not just targeting schools and teenagers; it goes beyond that.

“The day began with 17 seconds of silence to remember those they lost. Students described a roller coaster of emotions as they walked into a school filled with friends, grief counselors and comfort dogs. Throughout campus, posters offered encouraging messages, reminding them ‘We get courage from each other,’” CNN reported in a follow up article.

This is not just schools, though. This is churches, nightclubs, concerts, movie theaters, airports, and more. A child should not fear a bullet on their walk home. We may be children, but we are not fighting for just children,” a partial Mission Statement made by the MFOL movement on their website. “All lives are precious, and our country must make the safety of its citizens a number one priority.”

“I felt very prideful to be able to participate in such a great movement seeing everyone bow their heads in silence and respect those that passed when they shouldn’t have,” Christopher Torres said when talking about his presence in the walk out.

Teenagers across the country are making a statement, encourage for things to changes, as  no government official wants to step forward and change our gun laws to make them have more restrictions. Millennials are the future for change in our society. Chris said, “deep down we all care about our safety as well as those close to us.”

 

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