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한국 음식을 좋아하세요? |Hanguk umsigul choahaseyo?

Photo provided by Merit Abshire

Photo provided by Merit Abshire

Merit Abshire, Student Contributor

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Do you like Korean food?

My newest obsession with cooking my own food in restaurants has stemmed from the experience I enjoyed at Guh-mok Korean BBQ at a friend’s birthday dinner. The oil burns I received from the constant passing of the tongs so that everyone would get a chance to cook their own meat still pinch my skin every now and then when I try to cook something at home in my somewhat organized but bland kitchen. The experience was one of a kind and now I find my expectations raised to a certain degree every time I’m looking to indulge in Korean cuisine.

The origin of Korean barbecue dates back to when Koreans descended from the eastern barbarians of Mark, a nomadic civilization who left their territory in central Asia to go east. The Maek brought a sustainable yet special kind of meat with them to satisfy their hunger through the harsh elements they expected to face on their journey. They called it Maekjeok, which was meat that was already seasoned and ready to cook as opposed to the standard practice of seasoning your meat after it was cooked.

If you’re looking for a traditional Korean barbecue meal for 2-3 people with the elements ranging from Kimchi to zucchini, to pasta, then Guh-mok Korean BBQ will satisfy your needs. The restaurant is very quaint and decorated with traditional Korean accents to complement the culture with contemporary-modern elements commonly found throughout Southern California buildings. The table tops are heavy granite slabs with two burner stoves on each end to assist 4 people for their meal with a small wooden box loaded with metal chopsticks and spoons for the noodles provided.

You’re given the option to order the traditional Korean barbecue experience, which can be quite expensive, so make sure you bring company with you to adjust to the large helpings of meat they provide, or to order a few simple, affordable things from the menu. The beef sirloin is washed and soaked in a scarlet juice to give flavor and seasoned nicely with pepper and a hint of salt and onion mixed together, while the chicken is moist with salt. In the traditional experience, your table is loaded with sides ranging from creamy sour cream penne pasta to sweet Kimchi to noodles and chopped vegetables. It almost looks like a painter’s palette and the burner stove is the canvas for you to cook on. The place is relatively affordable for your average middle-class working family looking to satisfy their needs for a savory yet affordable experience.

The waitresses worked hard to make sure our needs were met and constantly cleaned the bathrooms, tables, and helping some inexperienced cooks with their meat. For 15 years of experience, the restaurant appears to be doing well with their upkeep and making sure their customers are satisfied.

The restaurant is located at 2216 Sepulveda Blvd., Torrance, CA 90501 and has a vast parking lot. I’d recommend parking right in front of the restaurant to avoid having to walk a long distance to your car, especially since the spaces are almost always empty. You can place an order beforehand or make reservations: 310-517-9200.

HOURS: 11:00 am – 10:00 pm, Everyday | PRICE RANGE: $11-30 | ATTIRE: Casual | Credit cards and Cash accepted (No Apple Pay or Android Pay)

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1 Comment

One Response to “한국 음식을 좋아하세요? |Hanguk umsigul choahaseyo?”

  1. Kamyran Williams on February 9th, 2018 10:18 am

    “The origin of Korean barbecue dates back to when Koreans descended from the eastern barbarians of Mark, a nomadic civilization who left their territory in central Asia to go east. The Maek brought a sustainable yet special kind of meat with them to satisfy their hunger through the harsh elements they expected to face on their journey. They called it Maekjeok, which was meat that was already seasoned and ready to cook as opposed to the standard practice of seasoning your meat after it was cooked.” You learn something new evry day I didn’t know that.
    P.S that resteraunt is really good

    [Reply]

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