• May 18GLOW CRAZY! Kickback: September 28

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The Vitruvian Post

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Alison Howard, Web Designer

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We are all dreamers.

 

English, Polish, Mexican, Iranian.

 

The wealthy.

 

The underprivileged.

 

Everyone has hope for their future, a desire to do more, passions awaiting to be unlocked.

On September 5th, the Trump administration announced it would formally end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. DACA is an American immigration policy passed by our former president, Barack Obama, to protect dreamers that entered the country illegally during their childhood. DACA recipients became eligible for work permits and are allowed to attend university, but are required to reapply every two years.

Evelin Villa, a seventeen year old student from Animo Leadership Charter High School, moved here from Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico as a child. As a current recipient of DACA she states, “I feel DACA is important because personally it felt as if I was able to breathe again. I don’t have to necessarily be fearful every time I see a simple police officer. DACA brings unimaginable opportunities that growing up I only saw citizens getting because they had that privilege. A privilege I believe I am worthy of obtaining as well no matter where I come from.”

President Donald Trump and his administration rescinded DACA September 5th, and released a statement called, “President Donald J. Trump Restores Responsibility and the Rule of Law to Immigration.” Under this statement there are three headers with more extensive information on each topic; Responsibly Ending Unlawful Immigration Policy, Restoring Law and Order to Our Immigration System, Reforming Immigration To Make America Great Again.

The last category outlines President Trump’s priorities to pursue reforms he believes are necessary to protect American workers which are, “controlling the border… improving vetting and immigration security…enforcing our laws… and establishing a merit based system of entry.” Although the statement does release some details on how President Trump is planning to accomplish these things, there is no credible information on how he is planning to approach DACA being re-instated, something many democrats have explicitly stated will be discussed.

The public responded in outrage with countless rallies and marches across the country.

I was able to attend the march on September 10th walking from MacArthur Park to Olvera Street in Downtown Los Angeles.

Hundreds swarmed the streets shouting“No Trump, No KKK, No fascist USA” and “Sin papeles y sin miedo.” Many protesters also carried signs ranging from “#defendDACA” to “Roses are red, Taco’s are enjoyable, don’t blame Mexican’s because you’re unemployable.”

The first DACA speaker mentioned that although the Trump administration made a horrible decision robbing immigrants of their prosperity, he ended up bringing them together.

Solidarity was a key theme throughout the march; immigrants, second generation immigrants, and allies all marched together in defiance against Trump’s administration’s decision.

Promise Li, a member of the Democratic Socialists of America, is an ally of undocumented immigrants. Believing in socialist government he calls for, “a world where borders aren’t enforced the way they are now, people won’t be discriminated against based on their citizenship, race, gender or any other label that some may think defines a person.”

Noah Goldman, a former Da Vinci Communications High School student and member of Democratic Socialists of America, attended the march. He says, “nationalities are a social construct that was built by people in power with a goal of extracting as much labor from ‘others’ as possible so they can get wealthy.”

Throughout history people have allowed persecution and genocide as long as it wasn’t done to someone of their specific “group.” This needs to change. No one should be treated as inferiors based on differing characteristics.

We are all dreamers. Why discriminate others? Why do we deem some dreams more important than others? Why are some dreamers not allowed to reside on American soil?

 

Don’t we all dream?

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